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FSU President Marlene Kim’s remarks to the Board of Trustees, UMass Lowell, 9/19/18

I am the President of the Faculty Staff Union at UMass Boston.  I broke my leg this past weekend, so I wasn’t going to address you today.  But I decided to appear because I wanted to tell you that UMass Boston is broken.  We’ve been appearing at Board of Trustees meetings for over two years to tell you that it is broken, but we have received few resources and little help. 

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Professor Emilio Sauri’s Response to Professor Stacy D. VanDeveer

I want to thank Stacy D VanDeveer for his comments on the parking bargaining posted recently on the FSU blog. Professor VanDeveer’s comments provide a useful perspective on how we might approach the issue of parking as a bargaining unit. That said, in the spirit of collegial debate, I’d like to respond to the three points he makes in his post.

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Opinion from Professor Stacy D. VanDeveer on Parking Bargaining

FSU Colleagues,

Marlene Kim and a few others have very generously listened to my concerns about our union’s demands that UMass students and programs subsidize faculty to drive their cars to campus. I think this is bad policy on social justice, community impact and environmental grounds. My concerns are threefold: Continue reading

Open Letter on Parking Bargaining from FSU Member Bonnie Miller

Dear Faculty,

I attended the FSU meeting today on parking, and the turnout was pretty light. I get it because my schedule is crazy, too, but this parking issue is too important to let our busy schedules get in the way. So in order to make sure everyone is in the loop, I am going to break it down here for everyone.

The proposal on the table from the administration is awful. The biggest problem as I see it (from a faculty perspective) is that they have removed the multi-park passes, which means that you would have to buy semester/annual passes in order to get a pre-tax discount, and many of us don’t come in enough days to make buying a semester or annual pass worth it. This means we would be stuck paying the $15/per day rate. You cannot get the tiered rate unless you purchase the semester/annual passes. This will very quickly eat up that 2% raise we just got. We need to be incentivized to come to campus, not to stay at home! I could go on and on about other issues, especially when you consider our students and their financial situations, but I will leave it at that for now.

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Insult to Injury: UMass’ Acquisition of Mt. Ida College and What Happens Next

“UMass Boston is under attack!” said Barbara Madeloni, MTA President, at the recent UMB forum on April 18th. For the past two years, UMB students, faculty, and staff have suffered from unrelenting cuts to programs, courses, centers, institutes, and more, not to mention additional challenges like the increased parking fees that will have severe short and long term repercussions for the entire community. All the while, administrators, the Board of Trustees, and others have justified these austerity measures by claiming that they are necessary in order to deal with UMB’s debt. Yet they don’t seem to mind UMass Amherst’s taking on Mt. Ida’s $55 to $70 million debt as part of this deal.

Perhaps what’s most galling is that UMB, the UMass system’s diversity flagship, has been denied money for new buildings and repairs it has desperately needed for decades. At the same time, UMass Amherst, the system’s elite flagship, can purchase for itself a second campus to enjoy the “pastoral base of operations for internships and academic collaborations” that this new 72-acre campus will provide.

It’s easy to see why Barbara Madeloni and Joan Vennochi of The Boston Globe calls this whole affair “an education in institutional racism”  in their scathing assessments of what this deal means for UMB and why Arthur Mabbett, chairman emeritus of the UMB Board of Visitors, believes this purchase will further the inequality between UMass Boston and UMass Amherst.

All these concerns and more were voiced at the April 18th meeting at UMB that drew hundreds of attendees. Professional Staff Union President Tom Goodkind warned this was, “an acquisition that…ultimately threatens to bleed us dry.” UMB undergraduate student government president Katie Mitrano observed, “putting another campus in the vicinity of Boston makes it harder for our working-class, majority-minority students to compete for jobs, internships and money in a city that already has dozens of schools competing for them.” And FSU President Marlene Kim said that UMB “will lose programs…faculty and staff, and we will lose the underserved,” a stark reminder that this Mt. Ida deal is part of a larger assault on UMB and its mission (her full statement can be found here).

Mt. Ida students, faculty, and staff have also obviously been hurt. All 280 faculty and staff are being laid off, while students are suddenly being forced to enroll at UMass Dartmouth over 50 miles away from Mt. Ida. Instead of focusing on finishing up major requirements and prepping for final exams, they must acclimate themselves to an entirely new university setting. A group of outraged parents is considering filing a class-action suit. The students at Mount Ida don’t want this deal, and UMass Dartmouth is not equipped to allow all students to complete their majors.

Part of the reason students and their families are scrambling is because this entire deal came as a shock to everyone. Mabbett admitted he was “blindsided” by the news, as were many state senators. In fact, there will be an oversight hearing regarding the pending deal because of the utter lack of transparency – even the Board of Higher Education was surprised – they only heard about this purchase in the media even though they were supposed to have already  received notification and paperwork for this transaction.

FSU is working with other UMB unions, organizations, students, and Mt. Ida parents to protest this acquisition at the upcoming Board of Higher Education’s Academic Affairs Committee meeting on Tuesday, April 24, at 9 pm at One Ashburton Place, Conference Room 1 on the 21st floor. Please attend!

Upcoming Action – Speaking Out on the Mt. Ida Acquisition Deal

FSU and other unions are working with the Mt. Ida community to protest this acquisition. The next opportunity to voice your concerns will be at the upcoming Board of Higher Education’s Academic Affairs Committee meeting.

This meeting will take place on Tuesday, April 24, at 9 am at One Ashburton Place, Conference Room 1 on the 21st floor. If you want to give a three minute public comment, email EQuiroz@dhe.mass.edu.

Supporting Students with Uncertain Immigration Statuses

At UMass Boston, almost half of the student population comes from immigrant families and many students and staff are DREAMers with undocumented or uncertain legal status. DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and undocumented students at UMass Boston are not eligible for public sources of financial aid. Those with DACA and TPS status can pay in-state tuition rates, but immigrants without those temporary statuses are often not eligible, even if they grew up in Massachusetts. These students often take 8-10 years to complete a UMass Boston bachelor’s degree because they are paying by course. Without DACA, undocumented students are unable to acquire legal employment. Nationally, an estimated 800,000 young people have DACA status.

When President Trump declared that DACA was to terminate on March 5, 2018, I witnessed DACA students experience extreme psychological and emotional stress as they faced living in the U.S. once again without legal status or protection from deportation. As the March 5th deadline approached, federal judges ordered the Trump administration to temporarily reinstate parts of DACA, including allowing DACA recipients to renew their protected status. DREAMers, as well as our students from Haiti and El Salvador with TPS (Temporary Protected States), are living in limbo. They are a part of the fabric of our Boston communities, yet federal laws seek to exclude them.

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Firsthand Accounts of the Severe Day-to-Day Damage of Parking Fee Increases at UMB

In late January of this year, the UMass Boston administration announced parking fee increases from the current daily rate of $6 per day to $15 per day on campus and $9 per day at Bayside once the new parking garage opens. This new fee structure was adopted on the recommendations of a report by the Walker Parking Consultants.

These increases would have a devastating impact on the entire UMass Boston community, amounting to an immediate pay cut for faculty and staff and a tuition increase for students.

The FSU reached out to students, faculty, and staff to hear first-hand how increased parking fees would affect their lives and the future of UMB.

“It will be really difficult,” Professor Beckwith warned, “for students who ha[ve] already committed themselves to degree programs [and] workers who can’t immediately go somewhere else.” Consequently, “we’re going to lose a lot of students’ both now and in the future.” This is obvious to undergraduates, a well – “Some students might just have to drop out due to not being able to afford the parking,” said sophomore Mitchell Lyon.

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FSU Candidate Forum

For anyone who missed the FSU Candidate Forum on February 28th, you can watch it in its entirety below.

And remember to check out all the candidates’ statements and profiles for the election, which will begin on March 2nd and end on March 9th.

FSU Candidates Forum

Missed the FSU Candidates Forum? Watch the whole thing here!Candidates for Executive Committee from left to right: Monique Fuguet (Senior Lecturer in Mathematics) – NTT Faculty Representative; Joseph Brown (Assistant Professor of Political Science) – Pre-Tenure Faculty Representative; Steve Striffler (Director of Labor Resource Center, Professor of Anthropology) – Candidate for FSU President; Tim Sieber (Professor of Anthropology) – Tenured Faculty Representative; Marlene Kim (Professor of Economics) – Candidate for Reelection for FSU President; Jeff Melnick (Professor of American Studies) – Tenured Faculty Representative; George Kelley (Senior Lecturer in the College of Management) – NTT Faculty Representative

Posted by UMass Boston Faculty Staff Union on Wednesday, February 28, 2018

2018/2019 FSU Executive Committee Elections – Candidate Profiles

The FSU Elections are taking place from March 2nd through March 9th. You will receive your ballot through your umb.edu email.

In addition to candidate statements, we have invited candidates to participate in the online forum.  Continue reading

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